Difference between revisions of "Encoding inhibition"

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Encoding inhibition refers to when some sort of cognitive event or environmental distractor reduces the efficiency of learning, rate of learning, or amount of learning during a learning event.
 
Encoding inhibition refers to when some sort of cognitive event or environmental distractor reduces the efficiency of learning, rate of learning, or amount of learning during a learning event.
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* Kane, M. J., & Engle, R. W. (2000). Working-memory capacity, proactive interference, and divided attention: Limits on long-term memory retrieval. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 26(2), 336-358.
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* Postman, L. (1976). Interference theory revisited. In J. Brown (Ed.), Recall and recognition. Oxford, England: John Wiley & Sons.

Latest revision as of 15:49, 12 December 2007


Encoding inhibition refers to when some sort of cognitive event or environmental distractor reduces the efficiency of learning, rate of learning, or amount of learning during a learning event.

  • Kane, M. J., & Engle, R. W. (2000). Working-memory capacity, proactive interference, and divided attention: Limits on long-term memory retrieval. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 26(2), 336-358.
  • Postman, L. (1976). Interference theory revisited. In J. Brown (Ed.), Recall and recognition. Oxford, England: John Wiley & Sons.